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Is DMAE safe for your skin? Watch for swelling of the skin.

I recently referred to my Natural Healing book (about the size of an encyclopedia volume) concerning anti-aging vitamins and nutrients for skin. Among the suggestions was something called DMAE. After visiting the Vitamin Shoppe and buying  a laundry list of vitamins, I began daily taking the supplements.

I also began applying freshly cut lemon to my skin and left it there during the day and at night while asleep. I began to notice my pores were getting cleaner, but my face seemed to be growing like Barry Bonds head on steroids. Not my desired look.

I stopped the lemon thinking it may be the culprit and began using Witch Hazel and a toner I bought while on a cruise. The swelling seemed to still be there. Then I investigated DMAE online and found the excerpt from the article below, the key points underlined for emphasis. If anybody has any experience with DMAE (and getting off it to reduce the swelling of the face), please let me know. I am taking 130mg capsule (which I will probably discontinue to see how this may reduce swelling of the skin).

Vacuolization is the development or formation of vacuoles (small cavities or space in the skin tissue) containing air or fluid. It’s kind of like when a guy uses steroids for muscular development or takes creatine, you retain water and blow up. Not a nice look in the face by any means.

RevivingNations@yahoo.com

http://www.PaulFDavis.com

DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol) is a skin care ingredient enthusiastically touted by many skin care vendors. One of the reasons for its popularity is that it is one of the very few agents (perhaps even the only one) shown to produce some skin tightening and modestly reduce facial sag.

However, a 2007 study published in the British Journal of Dermatology raised safety concerns regarding topical DMAE. Dr. Morissette and colleagues, from the University of Quebec, studied the effect of DMAE in human skin cell cultures and rabbit skin.

The researchers found that adding DMAE to the cultures of fibroblasts (key type of skin cells) produced the effect known as vacuolization. Vacuolization is often observed in cells after various types of damage as cells try to encapsulate and excrete foreign agents and/or their own damaged components. Hence the researches concluded that the vacuolization induced by DMAE was suggestive of cell damage. They also observed that DMAE impaired the ability of fibroblasts to divide. Notably, the above adverse effects reversed after DMAE had been washed out of the culture following a short-term exposure. (Long-term exposure has not been studied.)

http://www.smartskincare.com/ingredients/dmae_safety.html

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What Do Google and Saddam Have in Common? What Can Google Learn from National Geographic?

Dr. Trita Parsi (President of National Iranian American Council) and Babak Talebi wrote on article on May 14, 2008 titled What Do Google and Saddam Have in Common? originally published in The Huffington Post worthy of our time and attention.

It seems Google has a funny way of doing business — one that involves muddying politics in the Middle East. In recent months, the organization has taken the unprecedented step to rename internationally recognized bodies of water. Google Earth has begun using the controversial term “Arabian Gulf” to the body of water traditionally and internationally identified as the “Persian Gulf.”

Much is in a name as a name reveals an intended purpose and ideological persuasion.

In the Middle East, nothing is just a name. The Hebrews name their children intentionally using names that carry meaning and invoke their desirable destiny for each child.  With more than 180,000 US troops in this unstable region, being oblivious to the politics of geographical renaming is dangerous.

Historically, the accuracy of the term Persian Gulf is undisputed. Several legal documents from the United Nations as well as the United States Board of Geographic Names confirm the legitimacy of the term, as do millennia of classical history. For example, the ancient Greeks called the Persian Gulf, “Sinus Persicus,” the Romans called it “Mare Persicum,” and the Arabs called it, “Bahr al-Farsia.”

The political campaign to change the name Persian Gulf to the “Arabian Gulf” began approximately 50 years ago, as part of a pan-Arab strategy aimed at diminishing the status of non-Arab influences in the Middle East, including that of Iran and Israel.

It is a term whose very purpose has been to create divisions in an already divided region. Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser used it to rally the Arab masses against Israel and Iran. A decade later, Saddam Hussein used it to mobilize the Arabs in the war against Iran. Today, the term is frequently used by radicals and militants in the Middle East — again, with the aim to create divisions and fuel conflict.

Google now has the dubious distinction of joining Nasser and Saddam Hussein in this political campaign.

In February 2008, the National Iranian American Council (NIAC) sent a letter to Google’s CEO, Dr. Eric E. Schmidt, to explain the political background of the term and request that Google refrain from entering into the politics of geographical renaming and let the Persian Gulf remain the Persian Gulf.

More than three months later, Google has yet to formally respond to NIAC’s letter. In fact, the closest response NIAC has received is an ambiguous April 8 blog post on Google’s Public Policy Blog: “As the publishers of a geographic reference tool, we believe that Google should not choose sides in international geopolitical disputes. For this reason, we’ve chosen to implement a uniform policy of “Primary Local Usage.”
But what exactly is “Primary Local Usage”? And what is Google’ threshold of measurement?

Google defines its current policy of primary local usage as a combination of three separate markers (primacy, commonality, and locality) that they believe help Google avoid choosing “sides in international geopolitical disputes.”

According to a post on their public policy blog, the primacy marker means that out of each possible name only the most common name(s) for each body of water will be used. As for the commonality or the frequency of its use, a name must be widespread and not subject to arbitrary government renaming. Their final qualifier is the input of the neighboring nations that have a “stake” in the body of water; meaning that the deciding factor will be that neighboring nations all have input in potential names.

Although Google claims that this method allows for an “optimal combination of neutrality, objectivity, and legitimacy,” this unusual and uncharacteristically amorphous standard counteracts any “sensitivity” Google had hoped to convey.

In fact, it makes Google the very political tool it claims it seeks to avoid becoming.

In defense of its methods, Google has said that its safeguards will prevent a ruler from naming “the Pacific Ocean after her mother,” by requiring any potential name be commonly accepted by the general populace. Contrary to Google’s purported intentions, however, this policy actually opens the door for politically motivated geographical renaming.

By bypassing traditional academic sources, Google has turned itself into an enabler of those who would use name disputes to fuel conflict.

Had Google Earth existed in 1980 when Saddam Hussein first attempted to use the label “Arabian Gulf” as a way to rally support for invading Iran, it would have embraced the Iraqi dictator’s policy. By Google’s standards, Hussein’s arbitrary renaming would be (and is) a justifiable manipulation of geographical naming for political and divisive goals.

In fall 2004, the National Geographic Society (NGS) made a similar misstep by using the term Arabian Gulf for the Persian Gulf; but after a campaign led by the National Iranian American Council, the NGS recognized the folly of getting involved in the politics of geographical renaming and corrected their mistake in their 8th Edition maps.

Google could learn a thing or two from the NGS’s sensibility.

http://www.niacouncil.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1116&Itemid=2

International speaker and author of United States of Arrogance Paul F Davis interviewed Dr. Trita Parsi at the National Iranian American Council headquarters in 2008 discussing for an-hour-and-a-half foreign policy in the Middle East and most importantly between the U.S. and Iran. That video can be obtained by writing RevivingNations@yahoo.com (or) gmail.com

http://www.PaulFDavis.com

Paul F. Davis is a world-changing leadership & diversity speaker who has touched over 50 countries & 6 continents building bridges cross-culturally and empowering people throughout the earth to live their dreams!

Paul is the author of 14 books. Paul has appeared on numerous internationally broadcast radio shows from Oprah & Friends to Fox News Radio to talk about conflict resolution, peacemaking, foreign policy, and diplomacy. Playboy Radio host Tiffany Granath calls Paul an “awesome” relational coach and recommends his books on love, dating, and sexuality.

Academically outstanding Davis was trained in transformative mediation & conflict resolution (Hofstra Law School); strategic negotiations (Harvard Business School & U. of Washington); advanced interrogation (Reid & Associates founders of the polygraph); and NLP & Life Coaching (NLP & Coaching Institute of California).

Paul humorously and elegantly transforms individuals and organizations.

Paul’s organization Dream-Maker Inc. builds dreams, transcends limitations, & reconciles nations.

Paul worked at Ground Zero in NYC during 9/11; helped rebuild a home at the tsunami epicenter; comforted victims of genocide in Rwanda; spoke to leaders in East Timor during the war; inspired students & monks in Myanmar; promoted peace & reconciliation in Pakistan; and has been so deep into the bush of rural Africa where villagers had never before seen a white man.

Paul empowers people to love passionately and live fearlessly.

http://www.PaulFDavis.com

RevivingNations@yahoo.com


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OCD – Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Dr Oz and Jonathon Grayson

I watched Oprah last night with my wife and enjoyed seeing the interventions done by Dr. Oz and Jonathon Grayson for people struggling with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). I think we all know someone who struggles with something like this or manifests these irrational behavioral tendencies.

The common thread I heard throughout every story and conversation with those struggling with OCD was fear. They were all battling fear of some sort and deep paranoia. They developed various phobias based around their erroneous beliefs, which Jonathon and Dr. Oz challenged by making them confront their fears.

Exposure and response as it is commonly referred to in psychology was the methodology used to treat these precious souls. Some of the things they made them do were a bit odd and gross to watch, like putting their hands on the floor and toilet seats (after which they were told to lick their hands).

Oz and Grayson took a 2 mile walk through the streets of Philadelphia to wear down the participants’ defenses and get them to open up. After the long walk they stopped in a back alley with some rubbish bins, one particularly which smelled like puke, old sour food, and feces. After some coaching and prodding, all participants put their hands in the slimy rubbish and licked them afterward, some putting their dirty hands through their hair.

All of this was to get the people to realize they weren’t going to die if they did what they most feared. I must say however seeing Dr. Oz putting his hands on a toilet seat and licking them afterward was terribly disgusting. My wife who watches Oprah every day was eating her dinner during the program. I couldn’t resist saying, “Oh baby, maybe you should get free from your OCD (control freak) by licking the toilet seat and drinking some toilet water.” (I know I’m bad. She finished her meal unabated.)

I was very impressed with the intervention, but probably would not have done the gross methods myself to achieve the same results. Dealing with the roots and origins of the phobia is crucial.

One African American mother confessed when a loved one died years ago she felt as if it was her fault. This erroneous belief opened the door to fear as she falsely interpreted the event. Thereafter she (and another white mother on the show with similar circumstances) began to shelter their children and freak out about every little thing as a perverse protective mechanism. What the women failed to realize was in actuality they weren’t protecting their kids as much as they were harming them by imparting a spirit of fear and thereby removing them from life itself.

At the beginning all participants were initially reminded of the pain, loss of loved ones, alienation of friends, career loss, and financial hardships caused by their phobias. This helped each commit to the coaching and unique methods used to provide them their breakthrough.

After the intervention the people all looked way better, more free, present, and regained the glow in their countenance. One gentleman who always kept one hand in his pocket to stay germ free, was outdoors with both hands out, talking about playing in the dirt and having fun. He regained himself and thereby his life.

Jonathon Grayson occasionally throughout the segment called and referred to the fear everyone was struggling with as a “monster” saying: “When you run from this monster it follows you.” He later also called it a “devil” and encouraged one woman as she sought to pray to God for power to overcome it.

I was blessed to hear the one clean freak mom (white with short curly hair – sorry I don’t remember her name) testify to her breakthrough of taking her children out for ice-cream after the intervention. Her daughter wore a white shirt and got ice-cream all over it, but mom didn’t obsess or freak out. Upon leaving the restaurant she left without worrying about tidying up, pushing in the chairs, or agonizing over anything. A personal breakthrough for her!

Dr. Oz at the conclusion of the show summed up some key principles to freedom. “Surrender, get free from those attachments.”

As we are fully present and awake to our own past dysfunction, we can boldly deal with it and get the breakthroughs we deserve to live freely and be whole.

Truly what we resist does persist. Face your fears and live free!

Paul F Davis – Interventionist and Transformation Coach, Worldwide Minister, and Author

http://www.PaulFDavis.com

RevivingNations@yahoo.com (or) gmail.com

407-284-1705, 407-967-7553

Paul Davis is a worldwide minister who moves in the miraculous to touch and transform humanity.

Paul has a unique ability to hear the voice of God, naturally bring forth the supernatural in a playful & heartfelt fashion, unlock and simply explain divine mysteries, impart life changing revelation & usher in powerful manifestation bringing heaven to earth.

Paul has touched over 50 countries building dreams, transcending limitations & seeking to reconcile nations.

http://www.PaulFDavis.com

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